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Aragon coins catalog with values

 

The County of Aragon was formed on the ruins of Charlemagne's empire on the banks of the river of the same name in the northeast of the Iberian Peninsula, with Zaragoza as its capital. It had always been dependent on the kingdom of Pamplona (Navarre).
In 1035, after the death of King Sancho III the Great of Pamplona (aka Count Sancho II of Aragon), Aragon passed to his illegitimate son Ramiro, who achieved independence in a war with his brothers and declared his possession a kingdom.
In XII century Barcelona and Catalonia were annexed to Aragon, in XIII - Valencia, Majorca, Sicily and Sardinia, in XIV - Naples. So in the marriage of Ferdinand of Aragon and Isabella of Castile (1469), which foreshadowed the unification of Spain, the king of Aragon was not at all a poor relative. Although Aragon proper had always been the least economically developed part of the monarchy.
The unification with Castile was a dynastic union for Aragon (i.e. the following kings of Spain were also kings of Aragon, but only by right of succession from the previous kings of Aragon).
The kingdom was incorporated into Spain only in 1707.

 

Kingdom of Aragon

Dinero=2 obol

Alfonso I the Battler (1104-1134)

Alfonso (1073-1134) succeeded his childless brother Pedro I.
After the death of Alfonso VI of Castile, the King of Aragon (and Navarre) claimed his power (he called himself Emperor of all Spain). The grounds for this, however, were much less than those of Alfonso VI - King of Castile, Leon, Galicia and Portugal, that is, indeed, most of Christian Spain. On the other hand, the marriage with the heiress to the Castilian crown, Uracca, and was concluded for the sake that the possessions of Alfonso VI ruled by a man, and then they went to the children of Urraca. This did not work out, because Uraca already had sons by her previous husband, who were supported by some of the nobility. And then in 1110. the Pope dissolved the marriage because the couple were close relatives. Frankly speaking, almost all royal dynasties of the Pyrenees were related to each other, but the Pope did not always pay attention to it.
In general, it was not possible to become an emperor and Alfonso concentrated on conquering lands from the Moors, for which he was nicknamed the Warrior (El Batallador). In 1118 Zaragoza was taken from the Moors, and the king's army reached Granada.
During the siege of the fortress of Fraga, the king was wounded and died soon after.

 

 

coin Aragon dinero 1104-1134
dinero no date

billon
TOLLETA
ANFVSREX
Value - 25-30 USD

 

 

James (Jaime) I the Conqueror (1213-1276)

Jaime I (1208-1276) was the only son and heir of Pedro II. He received the nickname El Conquistador after conquering Mallorca and Valencia.

 

 

coin Aragon dinero 1213-1276
dinero no date

billon
IACOBVS REX
ARAGON
Value - 25-30 USD

 

coin Aragon obol 1213-1276
obol no date

billon
IACOBVS REX
ARAGON
Value - 20-25 USD

 

 

James (Jaime) II the Fair (1291-1327)

coin Aragon dinero 1213-1276
dinero no date

silver
IACOBVS REX
ARAGON
Value - 25-30 USD

 

 

Peter (Pedro) IV the Ceremonious (1335-1387)

coin Aragon dinero 1335-1387
dinero no date

silver
PETRVS DI GRAREX
ARAGON
Value - 25-30 USD

 

 

Real=34 maravedi; Maravedi=2 dinero

Philip (Felipe) III (king of Spain as Philipp IV) (1598-1621)

coin Aragon dinero 1598-1621
dinero no date

copper
ARAGONVM REX FECHA
PHILIPPVS III D G
Value - 10-15 USD

 

 

Charles (Carlos) II king of Spain (1665-1700)

coin Aragon dinero 1678
dinero 1678

copper
ARAGONVM 1678
CAROLVS II D G
Value - 10-15 USD

 

 

Philipp (Felipe) IV (king of Spain as Philipp V) (1700-1746)

coin Aragon dinero 1700-1746
dinero no date

copper
Value - 10-15 USD

 

 

 

Coins of other Spanish States

Barcelona

Castile and Leon

Catalonia

Gerona

Majorca

Navarra

Urgell

Valencia

Vic

Viscaya

 

 

Coins of Aragon in the catalog are presented divided by historical periods, indicating the main characteristics and differences by type.
Inside the sections, the coins are sorted by denomination - from large to small.
The cost of the coin is approximate and is indicated specifically for the coin shown in the picture. You can use this price to evaluate similar coins (of the same type), but remember that the value is affected by many factors, such as the state of preservation and the date of minting. The cost of coins of the same type can vary greatly depending on the number of surviving copies.
Coins of Aragon presented on this page are not sold or bought - this is only a catalog.