US Quarter 2006 Nebraska State value

 

Currency - Dollar=100 cents
Face value: Quarter dollar ($1/4=25 cents)
Type - commemorative coin 50 States Quarters Series

Composition - copper-nickel clad copper
Diameter - 24.3 mm
Weight - 5.67 grams
Edge: Reeded

Mint Mark: D (Denver), P (Philadelphia)

 

US coin State quarter 2006 Nebraska
Years of mintage:
2006

Reverse:
Chimney Rock National Historic Site, Conestoga wagon
Legend:
NEBRASKA 1867 / CHIMNEY ROCK / 2006 E PLURIBUS UNUM

Obverse:
Washington facing left
Legend:
QUARTER DOLLAR / UNITED STATES OF AMERICA / LIBERTY / IN GOD WE TRUST


Krause catalog number - KM#383

Coin value in condition:
UNC (Uncirculated - without traces of circulation) - ~1 USD.00
XF (Extremely Fine) - 0.25-0.50
Worse than "XF" - 0.25 USD

 

NEBRASKA #37

Capital: Lincoln.
Adhered to: March 1, 1867.
Population: 1,758,787Hab.
Origin of the name: It is believed that it comes from the Oto "Nebrathka" Indian tribe and means "smooth water" in reference to the Río de la Plata.
Reverse shows in the foreground a settlers' cart pulled by oxen, in the background the legendary Chemney Rock and a very bright sun, the legend "CHIMNEY ROCK" and above the date of incorporation into La Unión.

KM#(D): KM#(S):
Chimney Rock is a famous geological formation found in Morrill County, western Nebraska.

 

It measures approximately 91 meters from the base, and is 1,288 meters above sea level.
Virtually any traveler who travels to Nebraska by train will be able to see the Chimney rock, since it served as a reference when building the train tracks in the 19th century, so the Oregon and Mormon trains, the Pony Express, the Lewis and Clark, the Texas-Ogallala, and the Sydney-Deadwood.
It was declared a National Historical Monument on August 9, 1956 and since then the State Historical Society has been in charge of its maintenance and conservation.
Carriages pulled by horses, mules or oxen are the living legend of North American expansion.

 

From the 18th century until the construction of the railway lines through the American center and west, they were the means of transport used by the colonists in their trips to new territories.
They were introduced by the first German settlers in the 17th century and evolved both in terms of carrying capacity and comfort for their travelers.
An ox cart was capable of 25 kilometers a day, while a family of settlers used to travel a distance of approximately 7,300 kilometers from the East Coast to the Midwest.
The reference to the bright sun on the back is undoubtedly a sign of the high temperatures that occur in the State, for the most part it is a vast desert.
Chimney Rock.
Monument to the oxcarts.

Reference for the train layout.