US Quarter 2003 Alabama State value

 

Currency - Dollar=100 cents
Face value: Quarter dollar ($1/4=25 cents)
Type - commemorative coin 50 States Quarters Series

Composition - copper-nickel clad copper
Diameter - 24.3 mm
Weight - 5.67 grams
Edge: Reeded

Mint Mark: D (Denver), P (Philadelphia)

 

US coin State quarter 2003 Alabama
Years of mintage:
2003

Reverse:
Helen Keller seated, longleaf pine, branch, magnolia blossoms
Legend:
ALABAMA 1819 / HELEN KELLER / SPIRIT OF COURAGE / 2003 E PLURIBUS UNUM

Obverse:
Washington facing left
Legend:
QUARTER DOLLAR / UNITED STATES OF AMERICA / LIBERTY / IN GOD WE TRUST


Krause catalog number - KM#344

Coin value in condition:
UNC (Uncirculated - without traces of circulation) - ~1 USD.00
XF (Extremely Fine) - 0.25-0.50
Worse than "XF" - 0.25 USD

 

ALABAMA #22

Capital: Montgomery.
Adhered to: December 14, 1819.
Population: 4,557,808 hab.
Origin of the name: From the Indian word "Alibamu" "Clear in the forest".
Obverse shows the image of the writer Helen Keller seated in a chair, to her right the reduced version of her name in Braille.

 

At the ends are 2 magnolia blossoms on the right and a pine branch on the left.

 

The legends of "HELEN KELLER" and "SPIRIT OF COURAGE""Spirit of Courage".

 

Up the date of adhesion to The Union.
Helen Keller was born in Ivy Green, Tascumbia, Alabama on July 27, 1880.
At 19 months of age, an illness caused him to lose sight and hearing, (possibly scarlet fever or meningitis) senses needed to learn to speak.

 

By the age of 7 he had invented some 70 systems to communicate with his family.
Her mother took her to see a specialist doctor, Alexander Graham Bell, who introduced her to Anne Sullivan, a teacher at a center and blind at the age of 20, they would not be separated in 49 years.

 

Anne isolated her in a small house with a garden to begin to "educate" her despite her disabilities. She discovered the Norwegian Tadoma method, which consisted of touching the lips and throats of the person who was speaking to her until she understood it.
Later, Helen also learned to read English, French, German, Greek and Latin through Braille.

 

In addition to being a writer, she was a socialist political activist and advocate as a lawyer for the disabled.

 

She founded in 1915 a non-governmental institution to prevent blindness, she wrote columns in favor of working people and made numerous trips around the world, especially to Japan, where she was much loved.
In 1964, President Johnson awarded him the US Civilian Medal of Merit, the highest award in this country.
He finally died on June 1, 1968.
The inclusion of braille on the quarter dollar coin becomes the first in the US to have a dual script, and possibly the first in the world.
The pine branch and magnolias are the plants

KM#(D):344KM#(S):344a

Helen Keller

Detail of the Braille on the coin.

Pinecone.

Magnolia flower.
state adoptive