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French euro coins catalog with values

 

Previous - French coins before euro

French Republic

Reform 2002 (coins minted since 1999)
Euro=100 euro cents

coin France 5 euro 2008
5 euro 2008

silver
EURO 5 / LIBERTE EGALITE FRATERNITE / Value within hexagon
RF / Sower, full length
Value - 10-15 USD

 

 

coin France 2 euro 2000
2 euro 2000 (1999-2006)

bi-metallic - nickel-brass/copper-nickel
2 EURO
RF / LIBERTE EGALITE FRATERNITE / 2000
Value - 3-4 USD

 

coin France 2 euro 2018
2 euro 2018 (2007- )

bi-metallic - nickel-brass/copper-nickel
2 EURO
RF / LIBERTE EGALITE FRATERNITE / 2018
Value - 3-4 USD

 

 

coin France 1 euro 2002
1 euro 2002 (1999-2006)

bi-metallic - copper-nickel/nickel-brass
1 EURO
RF / LIBERTE EGALITE FRATERNITE / 2002
Value - 2-3 USD

 

coin France 1 euro 2012
1 euro 2012 (2007- )

bi-metallic - copper-nickel/nickel-brass
1 EURO
RF / LIBERTE EGALITE FRATERNITE / 2012
Value - 20-40 USD

 

 

coin France 50 euro cent 2001
50 euro cent 2001 (1999-2006)

brass
50 EURO CENT
RF / 2001
Value - ~1 USD

 

coin France 50 euro cent 2015
50 cents 2015 (2007- )

brass
50 EURO CENT
RF / 2015
Value - 8-12 USD

 

 

coin France 20 euro cent 1999
20 euro cent 1999 (1999-2006)

brass
20 EURO CENT
RF / 1999
Value - <1 USD

 

coin France 20 euro cent 2017
20 cents 2017 (2007- )

brass
20 EURO CENT
RF / 2017
Value - <1 USD

 

 

coin France 10 euro cent 1999
10 euro cent 1999 (1999-2006)

brass
10 EURO CENT
RF / 1999
Value - <1 USD

 

coin France 10 euro cent 2012
10 euro cent 2012 (2007- )

brass
10 EURO CENT
RF / 2012
Value - <1 USD

 

 

coin France 5 euro cent 2013
5 euro cent 2013 (1999- )

copper plated steel
5 EURO CENT
RF / 2013
Value - <1 USD

 

 

coin France 2 euro cent 2005
2 euro cent 2005 (1999- )

copper plated steel
2 EURO CENT
RF / 2005
Value - <1 USD

 

 

coin France 1 euro cent 2006
1 euro cent 2006 (1999- )

copper plated steel
1 EURO CENT
RF / 2006
Value - <1 USD

 

See also - commemorative euro of France

 

 

France

French Republic (fr. Republique francaise)
Capital: Paris Area: 551695 km2 (metropolis)
Population: 63.9 million (2013, metropolis)
Official language: French
Currency before the introduction of the euro: French franc = 100 centimes
Euro introduction date: 1 January 1999 in cash, 1 January 2002 in cash
Head of State: President
Form of government: presidential-parliamentary republic
On the national side of the euro coins of the French Republic, it was initially decided to display one of the popular themes: national symbols, works of art or famous personalities. 1240 works were submitted to the jury chaired by French Minister of Economy and Finance Jean Artun. Of these, in June 1997, the commission selected the best three, which were depicted on coins of different nominal groups.

The design of the national side of the euro coins of France in denominations of 1, 2 and 5 euro cents belongs to the artist Fabienne Courtiade.

 

French euro coin set

 

She created the collective image of Marianne - a feminine and young Frenchwoman who embodied the rebellious spirit of the Republic. Marianne is depicted as a young woman wearing a Phrygian cap. Such a headdress has been known since ancient Rome. It was worn by freed slaves, which was the reason for using it as a symbol of freedom. It is assumed that the name Marianne is derived from two female names: Marie and Anna, which were especially popular in France in the 18th century.
In 1792, the National Assembly of France adopted a resolution according to which a woman in a Phrygian cap and with a spear in her hands should be depicted on the new state seal. Since then, Marianne has become the national symbol of the country, the personification of the French motto "Liberty, Equality, Fraternity." Marianne's profile is depicted on the state seal of the country, coins and postage stamps. French sculptors and artists have repeatedly depicted her in their creations. Since 1875, the sculpture of Marianne has become an obligatory attribute of state authorities.

On coins of 10, 20 and 50 euro cents, a sower girl is depicted. It first appeared on French coins during the Third Republic in 1897, thanks to the efforts of medallist artist Louis Oscar Roty (Louis Oscar Roty, 18461911), president of the French Academy of Arts. Modern image processing belongs to the engraver Laurent Jorio (Laurent Jorio, b. 1973).
In subsequent years, the sower girl often appeared on French coins of various denominations, and her image became one of the main elements of French numismatic art.

 

sower in franc and euro

 

The sower girl was depicted on the coins of the French Republic of various denominations. On the left - 1 franc sample 1960-2000.

The 1 and 2 euro coins are decorated with a stylized tree enclosed in a hexagon, representing life and continuity of development. The design was created by artist Joaquin Jimenez (Joaquin Jimenez, b. 1956). Around the main image is engraved the motto of the French Revolution "Liberte, Egalite, Fraternite" ("Liberty, Equality, Fraternity").

In many countries, the tree is considered a symbol of nature, life, stability, unity and continuity of development. The use of the hexagon is explained by the geographical shape of the country's territory, which is often called "l'hexagone" (translated from French as "hexagon").
The tree, with its roots in a hexagon and flowering branches stretching towards the Eurostars, symbolizes France, its independence and identity, combined with the desire for the unification of Europe.
The famous French slogan "Liberte, Egalite, Fraternite" was first formulated in 1789. based on the Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen. In 1790, Robespierre proposed to depict this inscription on the flags of the National Guard, but his initiative was not supported.
Officially, the expression "Liberty, equality, fraternity" became the national French motto after the Revolution of 1848. This slogan became the main principle of the Second Republic and in 1848 was introduced into the constitution. It is also present in the constitutions of 1946 and 1958.

The coins are minted at the Paris Mint. Its designation on coins is the cornucopia.

Also on the coins there is the designation of the head of the engraving workshop of the mint. Over the years, this sign has been different:

 

 

 

Other French coins

Kingdom before 1560

Charles IX (1560-1574)

Henry III (1574-1589)

Catholic League (1589-1596)

Henry IV (1589-1610)

Louis XIII (1610-1643)

Louis XIV (1643-1715)

Louis XV (1715-1774)

Louis XVI (1774-1793)

Republic and Consulate of Napoleon (1793-1804)

Napoleon I (1804-1814)

Louis XVIII (1815-1824)

Charles X (1824-1830)

Louis Philippe I (1830-1848)

Second Republic (1848-1852)

Napoleon III (1852-1870)

Third Republic (1870-1940)

WW2 (Vichy and occupation)

Fourth Republic (1946-1958)

Fifth Republic Francs coinage (1958-2001)

Commemorative francs

Brief catalog 1870-2001

Commemorative Euro

 

 

Coins of French euro in the catalog are presented divided by historical periods, indicating the main characteristics and differences by type.
Inside the sections, the coins are sorted by denomination - from large to small.
The cost of the coin is approximate and is indicated specifically for the coin shown in the picture. You can use this price to evaluate similar coins (of the same type), but remember that the value is affected by many factors, such as the state of preservation and the date of minting. The cost of coins of the same type can vary greatly depending on the number of surviving copies.
Coins of French euro presented on this page are not sold or bought - this is only a catalog.