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Coins catalogue of Flanders

 

County of Flanders

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Louis II count of Nevers and Rethel (1322-1346)

coin Flanders Grosh ND (1337-38)
Grosh ND (1337-38)
silver
LVDOVIC COMES / SIT NOME DNI BENEDICTVM
MONETA FLAND
Value - $50-60
 

 

Louis inherited Flanders after the death of his father in the battle of Crecy. Father - Louis of Never, was a count of Flanders only nominally. In 1339 he was expelled by the insurgent citizens, because pursued frankly pro-French policy, as opposed to the interests of local burghers. Louis succeeded in strengthening himself in Ghent only in 1348.
Taught by bitter experience, he maintained neutrality in the Hundred Years War, concentrating on the accession of the surrounding cities, the most important of which was Bruges.
Nevertheless, the end of his rule was marked by another uprising of Ghent weavers, for the suppression of which, it was necessary to resort to the help of the French army.

 

 

Philip II the Bold duke of Burgundy (1384-1404)

coin Flanders Double grosh ND (1389)
Double grosh ND (1389)
silver
SIT NOME DOMINI BENEDICTVM
PHILIPP DEI G DX BVRG COM FLAND
Value - $80-100

 

Philippe (1342-1404) is the fourth son of the king of France, John II. In the battle of Poitiers (1356, at the age of 14!) he was the only one who did not leave his father and followed him as a prisoner. In 1361 his father handed him the duchy of Burgundy, inherited from the deceased childless Philip I of Rouvres. Flanders got to him after the death of the previous Count Louis of Mal, because Philip was the husband of his daughter Margaret.
After the death of his elder brother (King Charles V), Philip the Bold, along with other brothers, actually ruled France under the young Charles VI. In 1388 the king handed over the reins to another court group, but after his next bout of insanity (1392), the uncles regained their power.
The death of Philip the Bold violated the existing balance and marked the beginning of the war between Armagnacs and Bourguignons.

 

 

Joan the Fearless duke of Burgundy (1404-1419)

coin Flanders Double grosh ND (1409)
Double grosh ND (1409)
silver
MONETA NOVA COMETIS FLANDRIE
IOHS DVX BVRG COMES FLANDRIE
Value - $80-100
 

 

John (Jean) (1371-1419) son of Philip II. Received the nickname in the battle of Nikopol (1396), where he was the head of the French crusaders who helped the king of Hungary Sigismund in the fight against the Turks.
After the death of his father, fought for influence on the insane Charles VI with the brother of the king, Duke Louis of Orleans. In 1407, Louis was killed in Paris at the instigation of Jean of Burgundy, who had to flee the city. The place of Louis was taken by his father-in-law, Bernard d'Armagnac. In 1409, between the Armagnacs and the Bourguignons, the Treaty of Charter was concluded, in which the king forgave the duke. The civil war, however, continued, growing from small clashes into real battles. The heir to the insane king, the future Charles VII, gradually became the head of the opponents of the duke of Burgundy. In 1418, the Burgilions captured Paris and massacred the supporters of Armagnacs, in which the Constable d'Armagnac was killed. The Dauphin managed to escape. The Duke fortified himself in the capital, declaring himself the "protector of the king." In 1419, was held a meeting between the Dauphin and the Duke  in Monfero, in the middle of the bridge. There the duke was killed by people from the retinue of Charles VII, and he received the same wounds and the same weapon as Louis Orleans 12 years ago.

 

 

Philip III the Good duke of Burgundy (1419-1467)

coin Flanders Double grosh ND (1419-1467)
Double grosh ND
silver
MONETA NOVA COMITIS FLAND
PHS DEI GRA DVX BVRG Z COMES FLAND
Value - $80-100

 

Philip (1396-1467) - the eldest son of Jean the Fearless. Charging the dauphin Charles in the death of his father (I must say, not without reason), Philip, in 1420, entered into an agreement with the King of England Henry V, in which Henry became the heir to the insane Charles VI, and Philip as his viceroy in France. However, after 2 years, not painful Charles VI died, but vigorous and healthy Henry V. The contract formally continued the action and the minor Henry VI became heir to the King of France, but this was a completely different situation ... The energetic Dauphin gradually won the city outside the English. Philip, however, did not take an active part in the hostilities, preferring to attach nearby territories to his possessions. Finally, in 1435, the duke recognized Charles VII as king of France. In 1440, Philip supported the Dauphin Louis in the struggle against Charles VII (the uprising of Prageria).
It should be noted that the nickname "Good" does not speak of the duke's good nature or mercy. In those days, this definition meant rather "exemplary," in the sense of "knight's pattern". Well, sort of a "good warrior."

 

 

 

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